BP146: East African Federation: Tanzanian awareness of economic and political integration remains poor, but there is growing support for political links

Introduction

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Briefing papers
2014
146
Knowles, Josie

The current East African Community (EAC) was formally launched in 2001 comprising of Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. In 2007, the community expanded to include Rwanda and Burundi. Within this regional framework, the grouping has achieved two primary stages of integration: a Customs Union (2005) and Common Market (2010). Nevertheless, despite apparenteconomic progress, there are inter-state agreement and national implementation challenges which have negatively impacted upon further bargaining between the EAC partner states. Against this backdrop, hopes for imminent political integration, known as the East African Federation (EAF) appear illusive. This paper will draw attention to the national implementation challenges of the EAC by exploring Tanzanian public opinion towards the economic and political goals that the EAC continues to grasp for. The current East African Community (EAC) was formally launched in 2001 comprising of Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. In 2007, the community expanded to include Rwanda and Burundi. Within this regional framework, the grouping has achieved two primary stages of integration: a Customs Union (2005) and Common Market (2010). Nevertheless, despite apparenteconomic progress, there are inter-state agreement and national implementation challenges which have negatively impacted upon further bargaining between the EAC partner states. Against this backdrop, hopes for imminent political integration, known as the East African Federation (EAF) appear illusive. This paper will draw attention to the national implementation challenges of the EAC by exploring Tanzanian public opinion towards the economic and political goals that the EAC continues to grasp for.