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Zimbabwe

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Zimbabweans prefer foreign investment to indigenisation for job creation

A majority of Zimbabwean citizens strongly support encouraging foreign direct investment in comparison with the indigenisation of the economy as a means to create jobs. An overwhelming majority (72%) subscribe to the sentiment that foreign direct investment is the way to go in terms of rejuvenating the Zimbabwean economy.

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Zimbabweans pessimistic about economy and direction of the country

More than six in ten (63%) adult Zimbabweans think that the country is heading in the wrong direction, according to the most recent Afrobarometer survey (November 2014). This pessimistic outlook is shared across demographic groups of gender, age, place of residence (POR) and province though the depth of opinion differs. For example, while nearly three quarters of urban dwellers (73%) expressed pessimism, less than six in ten of their rural dwellers (58%) share this view and more males (67%) than females (60%) say the country is going the wrong way.

French

Zimbabweans largely ignorant of the 2013 Constitution

More than three quarters of Zimbabweans do not know about the Constitution enacted in May 2013 to replace the 33-year-old Lancaster House Charter. The new supreme law was overwhelmingly and peacefully approved in a referendum in March 2013 in which half of the adult population turned out to vote. Close to one and half years after this historic event, the latest Afro barometer survey in Zimbabwe reveals that more than three quarters of the country’s citizens (78%) either know nothing or very little about their national constitution.

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China has most influence on Zimbabwe but its development model is not the best

Just over half of Zimbabweans think that China has the most influence on Zimbabwe compared to that of other countries and international organisations. Nearly half also feel that China’s economic and political influence on Zimbabwe is mostly positive. However, only a fifth regard its development model as the best”. 

French

Zimbabweans feel corruption is on the increase but fear reporting over possible consequences

The latest Afrobarometer survey shows that a majority of adult Zimbabweans believe the level of corruption in the country has increased over the past year. Coupled with this is the public sentiment by a large majority that the Government is doing poorly in its fight against the corruption scourge.  Further, for a variety of reasons including fear of adverse consequences, incidents of corruption are underreported.

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Zimbabwe is going in the wrong direction; but whilst public approval of MPs and councillors’ performance tumbles, approval of President Mugabe’s leadership remains steady

Despite most Zimbabweans expressing discontent with the overall direction of the country, in terms of its deteriorating economic performance as well as rising corruption, the majority still approve of President Robert Mugabe’s leadership performance. His approval rating has only decreased slightly since it was last measured in 2012.. This persistent positive evaluation of the president stands in stark contrast to the growing opinion that Zimbabwe, as a country, is headed in the wrong direction.

French

Zimbabweans support ban on teacher incentives but decry banning of extra lessons

More than half of the adult population in Zimbabwe (54%) think that the payment of teacher incentives (monetary and/or non-monetary) in schools in addition to their normal salaries and benefits is not justified and should therefore be banned. This is according to the results of the
most recent Afro barometer survey (November 2014). This verdict is common across demographic groups of gender, age and place of residence.

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A day in the life of Afrobarometer's communications coordinator for Southern Africa

By Sibusiso Nkomo

Usually a communications officer at the core partner office has to oversee the communications work taking place at national partner level after survey in terms of backstopping, support and training where needed. Also you are required to attend at least one of the events to assess ability and provide technical assistance. 

On 20-22 May 2015, I attended the last event for the Round 6 survey in Zimbabwe on the performance of elected leaders, opposition parties; elections; Zimbabwe’s foreign relations; and migration in Southern Africa. 

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