Tanzania

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Tanzania

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Tanzanians approach competitive election with confidence in freedom to choose

As Tanzanians approach a competitive election for president, a majority of citizens say they trust the National Electoral Commission “a lot” or “somewhat,” and most feel “completely free” to vote for the candidate of their choice, according to new Afrobarometer survey findings.

Despite this confidence, significant proportions of the population voice concerns about the likelihood of a fair vote count, about bribery of voters, and about biased media coverage, and some citizens express fear of election-related intimidation and violence.

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10 things to know about Afrobarometer data & methodology.

1. Afrobarometer has collected data on the perceptions and attitudes of African citizens since 1999.

2. Our data are collected from nationally representative samples.

3. All respondents are randomly selected; every adult citizen has an equal chance of being selected.

4. Samples are distributed across urban/rural areas in proportion to their share of the national population.

5. We use face-to-face interviews in the language of the respondent’s choice.

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Tanzanians support critical free press, commend its performance, but want less negative reporting

A majority of Tanzanians support a critical and independent news media, but that support has weakened as more citizens express a desire for less negative news reporting, according to the latest Afrobarometer survey.

Two-thirds of Tanzanians say the media should constantly investigate and report on government mistakes and corruption, and a majority say the media should report any views and ideas without government control. But on both issues, support is significantly lower in 2014 than it was in 2012.

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Tanzanians express dissatisfaction with current living conditions, perceive declining economic conditions

Despite annual economic growth rates averaging of 7%, a majority of Tanzanians say their current living conditions are bad, according to the 2014 Afrobarometer survey.

Negative public perceptions of the country’s economic condition are also significantly higher than a decade ago.

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Tanzanians see increased corruption, ineffective fight against it

A majority of Tanzanians say that the level of corruption in the country has increased over the past year, according to the latest Afrobarometer survey.

The police, tax officials, and judges and magistrates perceived as the most corrupt. Citizens’ rating of the government’s handling of the fight against corruption has improved slightly since 2012 but still remains mostly negative – and far more negative than a decade ago. Tanzanians
laud news media’s effectiveness and show considerable support for the role played by the media in exposing corruption.

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China influence seen as strong, positive in Tanzania

China has a greater influence on Tanzania than any other country and is a preferred model for Tanzania’s future development, the latest Afrobarometer survey suggests.

Tanzanians see China’s economic and political influence on Tanzania as mostly positive, the survey shows. But only about half of Tanzanians say that Chinese assistance does “somewhat of a good job” or “a very good” of meeting Tanzania’s needs.

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REPOA Policy Research for Development

About REPOA

REPOA was established in 1994 and started operations in Tanzania in 1995. Our work revolves around undertaking and facilitating research, capacity building for researchers and using research to assist policy monitoring and design. Our main research activities themes:

  • growth and development
  • social protection
  • governance and service delivery

 

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